Whey-to-Bioethanol Valorisation: Fermentation with Immobilised Yeast Cells

Azhar Zhubanova1

Gulzhamal Abdieva1

Perizat Ualieva1

Nuraly Akimbekov3

Azhar Malik1, 2

Kuanysh Tastambek3, 4, 5,Email

1Department of Biotechnology, Faсulty of Biology and Biotechnology, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 050040, Al-Farabi 71, Almaty, Kazakhstan.
2Department of Fundamental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Care, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 050012, Tole bi 96, Almaty, Kazakhstan.
3Institute of Ecological Problems, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 050040, Al-Farabi 71, Almaty, Kazakhstan.
4Department of Biotechnology, Auezov South Kazakhstan University, 160012, Shymkent, Kazakhstan.
5Khoja Akhmet Yassawi International Kazakh-Turkish University, 161200, Turkestan, Kazakhstan.

Abstract

Bioethanol production is gaining prominence as a viable biofuel option, addressing the growing need to reduce fossil fuel dependence. To explore cost-effective substrates, cheese whey emerges as a promising alternative for bioethanol production. This study assessed the organoleptic properties and taxonomic composition of three whey samples: "Merke diary" (technical), "Amiran" (commercial), and “Stella Alpina” (commercial). Highly promising strains from the whey samples: Kluyveromyces marxianus A1 and A2, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae M1 and M2 were identified by genetic analysis. The immobilisation of Kluyveromyces marxianus A1 cells with superior adsorption rates on k-carrageenan for a period of 96 hours yielded the highest bioethanol production. Thus, this research signifies the potential of whey as a valuable resource in bioethanol production, aligning with the global shift towards circular economy.

Whey-to-Bioethanol Valorisation: Fermentation with Immobilised Yeast Cells