Way of Administrating Supramolecular Drug Associates Against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria in Improving Multidrug Therapy

Indrajit Chakraborty1

Sudipta Ray2,Email

Pathik Sahoo3, 4,Email

1Department of Chemistry, Malda College, Rathbari, Malda, West-Bengal, 732 101, India
2A. K. Mitra Institution for Girls, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.
3Functional chromophore group, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044, Ibaraki, Japan.
4Foundation of Physics Research Center (FoPRC), 87053 Celico, CS, Italy. 

 

Abstract

The development of new drugs to combat bacterial virulence and target specific locations is a major challenge in the pharmaceutical industry. Multidrug resistance in bacteria can occur through the accumulation of drug-resistive parts in multiple genes or increasing genetic expression for multidrug efflux pumps. Multidrug-resistant bacteria can be tackled with a combination of antibacterial drugs, known as multidrug therapy. An important drawback of this method is that administering each drug separately can lead to an incremental increase in drug resistance once the target bacterial cell is reached. Now, if we can develop the cocrystals of multiple drug molecules with tabletability and plasticity, we can administrate the sustainable multidrug to a target bacterium and ensure the killing, just after checking potential efficacy. The drug molecule selection process should involve considerations of crystal engineering principles for sustainable drug delivery to each bacteria cell, and complementary drug activities to ensure the killing bacteria. Now the multidrug will not raise the drug resistance step-by-step and the philosophy of multidrug therapy will be properly justified. We are bringing attention to the antituberculosis multidrug cocrystal therapy as a means to combat the impending tuberculosis epidemic, which is being overlooked due to the focus on Covid-19 treatment.

Way of Administrating Supramolecular Drug Associates Against Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria in Improving Multidrug Therapy