Recent Advancement of 2D Bi-Metallic Hydroxides with Various Strategical Modification for the Sustainable Hydrogen Production through Water Electrolysis

Sreenivasan Nagappan1,2

Hariharan N Dhandapani1,2

Arun Karmakar1,2

Subrata Kundu1,2,Email

1Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), Ghaziabad-201002, India.
2Electrochemical Process Engineering (EPE) Division, CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI), Karaikudi-630003, Tamil Nadu, India.

 

Abstract

The development of effective and suitable electrocatalyst for hydrogen production through water splitting reaction is matter of prime importance for the researcher owing to complex mechanistic pathway present in both half-cell reaction. Also, to minimize the usage of noble metal-based electrocatalyst by utilizing of low-cost, high earth abundant transition metal-based electrocatalyst has attracted the research community in a large extent. In this regard, the bimetallic layered double hydroxides (LDHs) play a vital role to nullify the usage of high Ru, Ir or Pt metal-based catalyst. Even though the LDHs is an excellent candidate for anodic counter part of the water splitting but its performance towards cathodic part is not so fruitful owing insufficient electroactive site. To remove these drawbacks several strategical modification techniques has adopted and effectiveness of those technique have justified to be very useful for the large-scale application. As mentioned, various strategies are available such as i) creating a nano structure; ii) doping of foreign cation; iii) anion replacement and inter-space distance modification; v) vacancy creation. Hence, this review, eventually emphases on how to overcome the matters faced with LDHs widely in terms of synthetic, exfoliation method and numerous strategies developed in recent years in the field of electrocatalytic water splitting application.

Recent Advancement of 2D Bi-Metallic Hydroxides with Various Strategical Modification for the Sustainable Hydrogen Production through Water Electrolysis