Thermal Necrosis Assisted Dental Implant Removal: A 3-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis

Nayana Prabhu1

Krishna Kumar2,*Email

Ritesh Bhat2 

Vathsala Patil3 

Suhas Kowshik2 

Utkarsh Swain2,4

Gautam Jaladi2,5 

Abhilash Agarwal6

1Department of Prosthodontics and Crown & Bridge, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, 576104 India. 

2Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, 576104 India. 

3Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, 576104 India.

4Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld 38678, Germany.

5Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering,  University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, United States.

6School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang, 707101 Singapore. 

 


 

Abstract

A 3-dimension (3D) model of a mandibular section of the bone was used to investigate the optimal contact area required to remove a dental implant via thermal necrosis using a 3-dimensional finite element method. The model includes cortical bone, cancellous bone, Straumann dental implant, and the crown was created using Dassault Systèmes CATIA V6® product lifecycle management software. Four different contact areas were analyzed by supplying power of 5, 24, and 40 W. At 5 W, the implant temperature is indeterminable for all the three implants considered - Ti6Al4V, titanium dioxide, and zirconia. The results of this investigation showed that increasing the diameter of the contact area not only reduced the time it took for the implant to reach 47°C but also dissipated heat evenly.

Thermal Necrosis Assisted Dental Implant Removal: A 3-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis